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Archive for September, 2010

Parental Advice from a World-changer

September 2nd, 2010 1 comment

John Quincy Adams was an amazing world-changer! As the son of President John and Abigail Adams, he was discipled by his godly parents in the art of Christian statesmanship. When his father was serving as the U.S. Minister in France, he sent for his young son to be with him. Under his father’s loving care and mentoring, he became so skilled and gifted in statesmanship that he received a Congressional appointment at the age of 14 to the Court of Catherine the Great in Russia! (Yes, I said 14)

He went to serve America as a US Senator, US Minister to France, US Minister to Britain and as the sixth President of the United States. He picked up the nickname, “Hell Hound of Slavery” for his tenacious and often single-handed opposition to slavery. When he was asked why he never seemed discouraged or depressed in his unpopular fight against the slave trade, Adams replied, “Duty is ours; results are God’s.”

What is the secret behind his courageous leadership?

Here’s an excerpt from a letter he wrote to “My Dear Son:”

“…so great is my veneration for the Bible, and so strong my belief, that when duly read and meditated on, it is of all books in the world, that which contributes most to make men good, wise and happy – the earlier my children begin to read it, the more steadily they pursue the practice of reading it throughout their lives, the more lively and confident will be my hopes that they will prove useful citizens of their country, respectable members of society, and a real blessing to their parents…”

He went on to add, “I have myself, for many years, made it a practice to read through the Bible once every year…”

We see a man mentored by his father, who is now teaching his own son, by example, the importance of being immersed in the Scriptures.

So simple, yet so powerful. What are you teaching your children?

The Radical, the Regular and the Real

September 1st, 2010 2 comments

Have you noticed that whenever we experience an attack by those who claim to be followers of Allah it is immediately followed by attempts to soften Islam’s image. People quickly retreat to the use of adjectives to provide distance from the one’s who have committed horrific and cowardly acts of violence against others. The evening news features Muslim representatives repeating the same tired and worn out explanations. “Islam is a religion of peace.” “These violent acts do not represent all of the Muslim community.” “This suicide bomber was part of a radical Muslim organization.” Blah, blah, blah.

So what we have is a dichotomy. We have “radical” Muslims and we have “regular” Muslims. I find this compartmentalization mystifying. After all, what makes a radical Muslim radical? Is it not the fact that they have read the Koran and they are trying their best to live out its commands and teachings? In other words, they take their faith seriously!

We need to move beyond the radical and the regular to discover the REAL. Islam is an entire worldview encompassing every aspect of the Muslim’s life. The goal of Islam is clear – to see the worship of Allah spread around the globe. To see this goal achieved, the killing of infidels is both necessary and justified.    

The Koran teaches that if a man dies fighting for Allah he is guaranteed the forgiveness of all sins and is assured of a reserved place in paradise (3: 157; 169). Further, he is promised a crown of glory and the sexual pleasures of 72 virgins. He is also absolved from the suffering of the grave and the horrors of judgment. And then there’s the added bonus that if you die striving in the cause of Allah, you can bring 70 of your relatives with you into paradise.

Here’s my point. If you believe this to be true and you are not a radical Muslim, then you are either a coward or a counterfeit. We must move beyond the false labels to the real ideology of Islam. While our Muslim neighbors deserve our love and kindness, Islam, as a worldview, demands our firmest resistance.

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